NC Child Fatality Task Force October Meetings

Friday, October 05th, 2012 | Author: Tracy

The Child Fatality Task Force has a number of meetings scheduled for October. All meetings are from 10 until 1 in room 1027 of the Legislative Building in Raleigh.  The call-in number for those unable to participate in person is  919-831-4296. Available materials will be posted on our website under the name of the  Committee.

 

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Three in Ten Young Children Live in Poverty in North Carolina

Monday, October 01st, 2012 | Author: Tracy

The share of children in North Carolina living in households falling below the poverty line remains alarmingly high, according to new data released by the U.S. Census Bureau.

Last year, more than half a million North Carolina children (roughly 580,000) lived in poverty. For the first time since the start of economic downturn the share of children in North Carolina who lived in households falling below the poverty line, $23,000 for a family of four, remained statistically unchanged–one in every four children (26 percent).

“Although these figures suggest a much-needed leveling of increasing child poverty rates in our state, the fact remains that far too many children in North Carolina are growing up without access to the opportunities that form the foundation of academic, economic and developmental success,” said Laila A. Bell, Director of Research and Data at Action for Children North Carolina, a leading statewide child policy research and advocacy organization.

Young children faced the greatest risk of living in poverty. Last year, 30 percent of children under the age of five in North Carolina lived in poor households, compared to less than 2 in 10 working age adults (17 percent) and 1 in 10 seniors (10 percent). The percentage of young children living in poverty increased 34 percent from pre-recession levels in 2007, outpacing the overall growth in poverty in North Carolina by more than 1.3 times.

“The experience of poverty during early childhood damages children’s developing brains and dims their future life outcomes,” said Bell. “Even as the recession placed more North Carolina children at-risk, state investments in evidence-based programs and supports to help ease the detrimental effects of poverty for vulnerable children have declined.”

The data paint a bleak picture of North Carolina households struggling to recover in the aftermath of the recession: median household income declined for the fourth consecutive year ($43,916, down more than $4,000 when compared to pre-recession levels), the share of employed workers flat-lined (55.1 percent for workers 16 years and older) and the income gap among North Carolina households grew.

“Children living in economically secure households have the best chance to reach their full potential,” said Bell. “These new data show many North Carolina households suffering from a lack of resources to meet their children’s most basic needs.”

Nationally, 48.5 million Americans (15.9 percent) fell below the poverty line in 2011, a more than 2.2 million increase from 2010 (46.2 million Americans; 15.3 percent). This annual change represents the fourth consecutive increase in the national poverty rate since 2007-2008.

via Action for Children

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UPDATE: Still Face Experiment Researcher Coming to NC

Monday, October 01st, 2012 | Author: Tracy

Online Registration is now open! https://www.wakeahec.org/CourseCatalog/CASCE_courseinfo.asp?cr=37279

A brochure also is available outlining the day’s events.

Ed Tronick, Ph.D., internationally known for the Still Face experiment, will be the featured speaker at the North Carolina Infant and Young Child Mental Health Association’s First Annual Meeting.

Exploring the Foundations of Parent-Child Relationships: Ed Tronick and the Still Face Experiment

November 9, 2012, 9 AM – 4:30 PM
Embassy Suites Hotel Greensboro Airport
Greensboro, NC

Register Online
$75.00 Member Registration Fee. $90.00 after 11/2/2012
$100.00 Non-member Registration Fee. $115.00 after 11/2/2012
$65.00 Student Member Registration Fee. $80.00 after 11/2/2012

Dr. Tronick will share his research findings, his theory, and videotapes of infants, young children, and parents to illuminate these processes.

Ed Tronick Ph.D. is an internationally known researcher and leader in the field of infant and young child mental health. His Still Face experiment, which uses microanalysis of infant/young child-caregiver interactions, led to creation of his Mutual Regulation Model. This Model views infants as part of an early dyadic communication system in which the infant and adult mutually regulate and scaffold their engagement with each other and the world by communicating and responding to each other’s intentions. Through this back- and-forth engagement, including matched and mismatched intentions and emotional states, the infant and young child learn about communication and emotional regulation. These processes form the foundation of social-emotional development and underlying brain architecture upon which the child’s later ability to regulate emotions and attend to tasks is built.

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UPDATE: Still Face Experiment Researcher Coming to NC

Monday, October 01st, 2012 | Author: Tracy

Online Registration is now open!  https://www.wakeahec.org/CourseCatalog/CASCE_courseinfo.asp?cr=37279

A brochure also is available outlining the day’s events.

Ed Tronick, Ph.D., internationally known for the Still Face experiment, will be the featured speaker at the North Carolina Infant and Young Child Mental Health Association’s First Annual Meeting.

Exploring the Foundations of Parent-Child Relationships: Ed Tronick and the Still Face Experiment

November 9, 2012, 9 AM – 4:30 PM
Embassy Suites Hotel Greensboro Airport
Greensboro, NC

Register Online
$75.00 Member Registration Fee. $90.00 after 11/2/2012
$100.00 Non-member Registration Fee. $115.00 after 11/2/2012
$65.00 Student Member Registration Fee. $80.00 after 11/2/2012

Dr. Tronick will share his research findings, his theory, and videotapes of infants, young children, and parents to illuminate these processes.

Ed Tronick Ph.D. is an internationally known researcher and leader in the field of infant and young child mental health. His Still Face experiment, which uses microanalysis of infant/young child-caregiver interactions, led to creation of his Mutual Regulation Model. This Model views infants as part of an early dyadic communication system in which the infant and adult mutually regulate and scaffold their engagement with each other and the world by communicating and responding to each other’s intentions. Through this back- and-forth engagement, including matched and mismatched intentions and emotional states, the infant and young child learn about communication and emotional regulation. These processes form the foundation of social-emotional development and underlying brain architecture upon which the child’s later ability to regulate emotions and attend to tasks is built.

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When Moms are Depressed, Children Affected

Thursday, September 20th, 2012 | Author: Tracy

A study published in Pediatrics finds that maternal depressive symptoms during infancy may affect physical growth in early childhood.

The researchers call for prevention, early detection, and treatment of maternal depressive symptoms during the first year postpartum to help prevent impact on young children.

Read the overview.

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Whooping Cough on the Rise; Free Vaccine for Limited Time

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012 | Author: Tracy

Whooping Cough (pertussis) cases are increasing across the country and North Carolina. A Forsyth County infant, just two-months old, recently died from Whooping Cough. Newborns and infants have not completed the series of vaccinations that would protect them, making them vulnerable to this disease.

Please use your networks to get this Whooping Cough Flyer into the hands of child care providers, home visitors and others who work with infants as quickly as possible. By age 11, children should receive the Tdap booster, but it’s never too late for teenagers or adults to receive the booster if they haven’t already. Many adults who had the vaccine as children have not received the booster. These adults can develop whooping cough where the symptoms are so mild, they can unknowingly spread whooping cough to babies in their care.

At the present time free Tdap vaccinations may be available from both clinics and private health care providers. New federal regulations may restrict the availability of these free immunizations to underinsured or uninsured patients only beginning October 1st.  Patients are advised to check with their clinic or physician’s office.

Download the Whooping Cough Flyer.

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Children at risk for abuse and neglect can be identified from birth

Friday, September 07th, 2012 | Author: Tracy

Researchers from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reported recently on the most significant findings from a twenty-five year study on families and children. The Family Child Study was initiated in North Carolina with the primary goal of improving the quality of policy and practice in order to promote child and family well-being based on sound evidence from the study. Two important findings from the study are that we can identify children who are at risk for abuse and neglect from the moment they are born and parental social support reduces the risk and the consequences of abuse and neglect.

The North Carolina Family Child Study became part of a larger national study, LONGSCAN (the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect), the longest such study ever undertaken in the US. LONGSCAN has four additional study sites around the country. Each of these sites has specific objectives and expertise to contribute to the group. The entire study is coordinated by UNC-Chapel Hill’s Injury Prevention Research Center. North Carolina’s Family Child Study is the oldest site in the study and has focused on the role of stress and social support in high-risk families and the factors that contribute to or lessen the risk of abuse and neglect. For two decades the Family Child Study followed North Carolina families and their children from infancy through young adulthood

“Child abuse and neglect is a dire problem nationally,” said Jonathan Kotch, MD, MPH, Principal Investigator on the study and Carol Remmer Angle Distinguished Professor of Children’s Environmental Health in the Department of Maternal and Child Health at the UNC Gillings School of Global Public Health. “There is increasing interest in and support for programs that offer hope that abuse and neglect can be prevented.”

The first set of findings was presented at a meeting in Chapel Hill, NC, which included researchers, public health professionals, policy makers and alumni consultants from the study. The purpose of the meeting was to review the recently released findings so that they can be utilized more effectively to improve future policy and practice. A series of additional meetings will be held around the country to review the data from other sites, culminating in a national meeting in Washington, DC, in 2013.

“We believe the findings from this study will help us advance new and more effective policies and programs that can lead to more children living safer, happier and healthier lives.” said Rosie Allen Ryan, President and CEO of Prevent Child Abuse North Carolina.

An important partner at this point in the study is the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation which recognized the need for the research findings from LONGSCAN to reach an audience broader than just the scientific community. The Foundation is supporting a project called From Science to Practice, led by Elizabeth Dawes Knight of the UNC Injury Prevention Research Center. The goal of the project is to effectively communicate the findings from LONGSCAN to professionals working to help families and children, to policy makers who make budget decisions and pass laws affecting families and children, and to communities and parents throughout the country as well.

“The families in this study made a critical contribution by helping us understand better about how families and children are affected by stress and social support,” said Desmond Runyan, MD, DrPH, Jack and Vicki Thompson Professor of Pediatrics at The University of Colorado and former Principal Investigator of LONGSCAN. “Families and children everywhere owe the participants in this study their thanks.”

The Family Child Study was funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the US Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS).LONGSCAN is supported with funding from the Children’s Bureau of USDHHS, with additional support from the National Institutes of Health, to the Injury Prevention Research Center of The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

 

Download the press release.

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Federal report shows drops in infant mortality, preterm birth rates

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012 | Author: Tracy

Annual statistics compilation notes increases in poverty, drop in secure parental employment

The infant mortality rate, the preterm birth rate, and the adolescent birth rate all continued to decline, average mathematics scores increased for 4th and 8th grade students, the violent crime victimization rate among youth fell, as did the percentage of young children living in a home where someone smoked, according to the federal government’s annual statistical report on the well-being of the nation’s children and youth.

However, the percentage of children living in poverty increased, and the percentage of children with at least one parent employed full time, year-round decreased, the report said.

These and other findings are described in America’s Children in Brief: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2012. The report was compiled by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics, a working group of 22 federal agencies that produce and use data on issues related to children and families. The report uses the most recently available and reliable official federal statistics to describe the family and social environment, economic circumstances, health care, physical environment and safety, behavior, education, and health of America’s children and youth.

“This year’s report contains good news about newborns,” said Alan E. Guttmacher, M.D., Director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. “Fewer infants were born preterm and fewer died in the first year of life.”

The report notes that infants born preterm or of low birth weight are at high risk of early death and long-term health and developmental problems.

“The findings in this report, drawn from many outstanding data systems across the federal spectrum, allow us to track key progress in the fight against many major public health threats, such as meningitis, for example,” said Edward Sondik, Ph.D., Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Center for Health Statistics. “The report shows that in the last five years there has been more than a five-fold increase in the percent of adolescents who have received the vaccination that helps prevent meningococcal disease—a serious bacterial illness and leading cause for the most dangerous form of meningitis.”

The Forum alternates publishing a detailed report, America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, with a summary version that highlights selected indicators. This year, the Forum is publishing America’s Children in Brief; it will publish the more detailed report in 2013.

New to this year’s report is a figure showing the percentage of children in race groups constituting less than 10 percent of the population (American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, or two or more races). This detailed figure is available only online at http://childstats.gov.

Among the findings in this year’s report:

  • A drop in births to adolescents, from 20 per 1,000 girls ages 15 to 17 (2009) to 17 per 1,000 (2010, preliminary data)
  • A drop in the proportion of infants born before 37 weeks’ gestation (preterm), from 12.2 percent (2009) to 12.0 percent (2010, preliminary data)
  • A drop in deaths before the first birthday, from 6.4 per 1,000 births (2009) to 6.1 per 1,000 births (2010, preliminary data)
  • A drop in the percentage of children from birth to 17 years of age living with at least one parent employed year round full time, from 72 percent (2009) to 71 percent (2010)
  • A rise in the proportion of children from birth to 17 years of age living in poverty, from 21 percent (2009) to 22 percent (2010)
  • A drop in the percentage of children from birth to 17 years of age living in households classified by the U.S. Department of Agriculture as food insecure, from 23 percent (2009) to 22 percent (2010)
  • An increase in vaccination coverage with one dose or more of the meningococcal conjugate vaccine for adolescents ages 13–17, from 12 percent (2006) to 63 percent (2010)
  • A drop in the proportion of youth ages 12–17 who were victims of serious violent crimes, from 11 per 1,000 youth ages 12–17 (2009) to 7 per 1,000 (2010)
  • A drop in the percentage of children, birth to 6 years of age, living in a home where someone smoked regularly, from 8.4 percent (2005) to 6.1 percent (2010)
  • An increase of one point in the average mathematics scores for both 4th and 8th graders from 2009 to 2011
  • A drop in the percentage of youth ages 16–19 neither enrolled in high school or college nor working, from 9 percent (2010) to 8 percent (2011)
  • A rise in the percentage of children from birth to 17 years of age living in counties in which levels of one or more air pollutants were above allowable levels, from 59 percent (2009) to 67 percent (2010)

Download the report.

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Growing Up Well: Supporting Young Children’s Social-Emotional Development and Mental Health in North Carolina

Tuesday, August 21st, 2012 | Author: Tracy

Research shows that early experiences, from age 0 to 5, have a strong influence on a child’s developing brain, providing a time of great opportunity and vulnerability.The NCIOM Task Force on the Mental Health, Social, and Emotional Needs of Young Children and Their Families recently released its report with recommendations for addressing the mental health needs of North Carolina’s young children.

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Shape NC Featured in Clinton Global Initiative Video

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012 | Author: Tracy

Shape NC, a partnership between The Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina (BCBSNC) Foundation and  The North Carolina Partnership for Children, Inc. (NCPC) to address  early childhood obesity, is featured in a Clinton Global Initiative video.

With a focus on the child care setting, Shape NC is increasing knowledge of nutrition and the importance of physical activity practices among young children, their families and teachers, with the goal of increasing the number of young children in child care at a healthy weight. Measures of success will include improved nutrition and physical activity practices in child care settings, healthier play environments and a state-level policy blueprint to impact the health of young children.

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