Nearly 75% of NC Early Childhood Professionals On Way to Being Certified

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011 | Author: Smart Start

The number of certified Early Educators in North Carolina is rising. Over 12,000 Early Educators are certified and another 19,000 have applied. Nearly 75% of the workforce is on its way to becoming certified.

Early Education Certification Benefits. A free year of membership from the NC Early Childhood Association for those already certified. Get updates on early childhood issues happening now in our legislature; receive reduced training costs and more. Click here to apply. Get discounts on services and goods from early childhood supplies to bath and body products! A full list of benefits is available online.

EEC renewal requirements support learning to keep children healthy and safe. The Institute and DCD are working together to help programs, directors and staff understand and meet EEC renewal requirements. Programs and individuals will be supported in maintaining their individual certification, resources for the program and/or facility licensure.

Time and support aid workforce in maintaining certification. Certified Early Educators will receive a letter outlining individualized renewal requirements to help plan for required continuing education. Certified individuals have between three and five years to complete their renewal requirements. Learn more about EEC renewal requirements.

Scholarship pays for most of EEC renewal requirements – even if you have a degree! T.E.A.C.H. Early Childhood® now has a scholarship that can support attaining college credits for EEC renewal, if you work in a regulated program and even if you already have a degree.

CEUs options are growing across the state – online and in person! Check out the new source list.  Visit the Institute’s Calendar of Events to find affordable, accessible CEU options across the state.

EEC is good news for child care businesses. Early Educator Certification is a model efficiency strategy, creating benefits for the field while reducing operating costs for thousands of child care businesses. Early Educator Certification:

  • Reduces burdensome expenses of purchasing, mailing and tracking duplicative education documentation for employers and individuals working in the field.
  • Provides families with information about the education of the teacher in her/his child’s classroom.
  • Decreases operating costs through discounted supplies and services and purchasing transcripts for multi-agency review.
  • Reduces the cost of continuing education for employers and individuals.
  • Reduces employer wait-time for hiring new employees.
  • Creates mobile verified education documentation for potential employees, for use at ALL regulated programs.
  • Reduces costs and creates efficiencies across state agencies and services.

Children deserve great teachers

Wednesday, January 12th, 2011 | Author: Smart Start

The NC Institute for Child Development Professionals  has a new publication intended to increase awareness about some of the many qualities of a great early childhood teacher and the importance of workforce supports. The brochure references supports including those provided through certification, scholarships, salary supplements and technical assistance.

Coming soon! A new section on the Institute’s web site called Great Early Childhood Teacher. It will include this brochure, hotlinks to supports and resources and more! Have ideas for this section? Let them know by sending an email to dtorrence@ncicdp.org.

What It Takes to Build Birth-to-College Education

Tuesday, December 21st, 2010 | Author: Smart Start

The University of Chicago Urban Education Institute and the Ounce of Prevention Fund are partnering to “build a model of public education for children and their families that begins at birth and creates success in school, college, and life.”

The goal is to collaboratively and continuously align and create instructional practices, and academic and social supports, to demonstrate a new model of public education that seamlessly and successfully prepares children for college, beginning at birth.

The challenges of forming a partnership between early learning/PreK and the K-12 worlds are documented in the case study, Working Together to Building a Birth-to-College Approach to Public Education.

From the Foundation for Child Development website.

Are Teacher Education Programs Aligning with PreK-3 Model?

Tuesday, November 09th, 2010 | Author: Smart Start

Researchers from Pennsylvania State University looked at how teacher education programs are aligned with the PreK-3rd approach. Not surprisingly perhaps, the researchers found tension between early childhood education and elementary teacher education programs. These tensions ranged from disrespectful attitudes to competition for placement slots.

They offer several reccommendations:

  1. Recognize ECE as a distinct and equal discipline.
  2. Administration support and leadership is needed.
  3. Opportunities for collaboration between ECE and Elementary TE Programs must be enhanced.
  4. PreK?3rd grade certificates should not overlap or compete with elementary teaching certificates.

Download the policy brief.

Read The New American Foundation’s Early Ed Blog analysis.

Read Education Week’s Early Years blog, Bridging the Divide: From Pre-K to Grade 3.

Improving Early Childhood Quality with Professional Development

Tuesday, November 02nd, 2010 | Author: Smart Start

Lifting Pre-K Quality:Caring and Effective Teachers, a new report by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, and the University of Texas, Houston, recommends the implementation of intensive teacher training and mentoring at the preschool level. It looks at the need to move from what it calls  input-based strategies (i.e. requiring bachelor’s degrees for preschool teachers) to those have more evidence of improving outcomes for children. The report is generating much discussion.

Maggie Stevens from New America Foundation’s Early Ed Watch provides an excellent summary. She notes that the frank conversation  around which approaches to improving program quality are proving successful, and which approaches simply aren’t successful enough are crucial if we want pre-k programs to help children reach their full potential.

In an Ed Week blog, Maureen Kelleher asks if the researchers asking the right question. She interviews Dr. Cheryl Roberts, who will be moderating a panel on PreK-3  at the annual NAEYC conference.

The report concludes by saying, “Minimal health and safety standards are essential for children’s well-being. But advocates and policy makers must go further, recognizing that progress depends upon elevating the skills of teachers and enriching relationships and instruction inside classrooms.”

Read more:

Studies Point to Importance of Education for NC’s Early Childhood Teachers

Monday, September 13th, 2010 | Author: Smart Start

Financial incentives provided to early childhood teachers in North Carolina are paying high dividends in the form of quality education for children, with more teachers pursuing advanced degrees across the state. The level of education an early childhood teacher receives affects matters ranging from pupils’ vocabulary skills to their self-confidence, according to the National Institute for Early Education Research.

Sue Russell, director of the Child Care WAGE$ Project, says a study from the University of Kansas found children of mothers with Bachelor’s degrees have four times as much vocabulary by age three.

“If we know that education of the parent matters, wouldn’t the education of the teacher matter, who is with those children 10 hours a day, five days a week?”

The Child Care WAGE$ Project helps provide more educated teachers for young children by helping them pursue additional training and rewarding them when they bring their skills back to the classroom. The financial compensation is a help to preschool teachers, some of them earning as little as $23,000 a year. Smart Start, the North Carolina Office of Early Learning, and the state’s Division of Child Development help fund the non-profit project.

Russell says counties that participate in the WAGE$ program have a 12 percent turnover rate, compared to 31 percent in counties that do not.

“By providing extra compensation we are both incentivizing teachers to get more education and providing incentives for them to stay.”

Last year more than 90,000 North Carolina children were taught by teachers who are part of the WAGE$ Project.

Click here to view this story on the Public News Service RSS site and access an audio version of this and other stories:

Studies Point to Importance of Education for NC's Early Childhood Teachers

Monday, September 13th, 2010 | Author: Eric

Financial incentives provided to early childhood teachers in North Carolina are paying high dividends in the form of quality education for children, with more teachers pursuing advanced degrees across the state. The level of education an early childhood teacher receives affects matters ranging from pupils’ vocabulary skills to their self-confidence, according to the National Institute for Early Education Research.

Sue Russell, director of the Child Care WAGE$ Project, says a study from the University of Kansas found children of mothers with Bachelor’s degrees have four times as much vocabulary by age three.

“If we know that education of the parent matters, wouldn’t the education of the teacher matter, who is with those children 10 hours a day, five days a week?”

The Child Care WAGE$ Project helps provide more educated teachers for young children by helping them pursue additional training and rewarding them when they bring their skills back to the classroom. The financial compensation is a help to preschool teachers, some of them earning as little as $23,000 a year. Smart Start, the North Carolina Office of Early Learning, and the state’s Division of Child Development help fund the non-profit project.

Russell says counties that participate in the WAGE$ program have a 12 percent turnover rate, compared to 31 percent in counties that do not.

“By providing extra compensation we are both incentivizing teachers to get more education and providing incentives for them to stay.”

Last year more than 90,000 North Carolina children were taught by teachers who are part of the WAGE$ Project.

Click here to view this story on the Public News Service RSS site and access an audio version of this and other stories:

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